Thursday, November 7, 2013

Joey Beltran: Bellator brought me in to entertain, and 'I'm going to deliver'


Back in mid-October, newly unemployed and still steamed about the UFC Fight Night 29 loss that cost him his job, Joey Beltran went out to lunch with an old friend.


In his younger days, Beltran used to DJ all around San Diego for a company called Xtreme Fun. Birthdays, fundraisers, Bar Mitzvahs; you name it, Xtreme Fun handled it. And on this particular autumn afternoon, with his former Xtreme Fun boss sitting across from him, Beltran decided that he wanted back in the DJ game.


"I was pissed off and depressed about the fight, about the (Fabio) Maldonado decision. I was just like, ‘I don't even want to do this anymore. This is bulls--t,'" Beltran admitted on Monday's edition of The MMA Hour.


"[My old boss was] like, ‘I think you should give it some time, Joey. I don't think you want to do that.' So shout out to that guy for talking me out of it."


That Beltran laughed as the words left his mouth, even less than a month after his UFC career came crashing down, explains just how drastic of a turnaround the fighter has undergone in a remarkably short time span.


Beltran was unemployed scarcely a few weeks before Bellator came calling, inked him to compete in February's light heavyweight tournament, then bumped up that debut with an opportunity he couldn't refuse. Now the 31-year-old is preparing for November 15, where he'll fill in for an injured Tito Ortiz against one of Bellator's most prized signings, former UFC champion Quinton "Rampage" Jackson.


In Beltran's eyes, not only is it a chance to redeem himself with a win over a name opponent, it's also an opportunity to bring back the old Mexicutioner style which first endeared him to fans.


"Here's the thing. Honestly, so much pressure is put on you -- for me, at least. While fighting in the UFC, I just always kind of felt like, geez man, every fight I'm fighting for my career. Every fight, if I lose I'm going to get cut, so for the last couple fights, it's been more on the side of, okay, let's figure out a way that I can win these fights," Beltran said.


"(But) this fight, I know what I'm being brought in there for. I don't have that pressure. If anything, if there's every been a fight where I've had zero pressure, it's funny that it happens to be the most important fight of my life.


"I'm brought in purely for my entertainment value," Beltran continued. "They haven't said that, but I know that. And so I'm going to go out there and I'm going to deliver. I've already told my wife, she's not coming to this fight. I told my family, listen, it could get pretty ugly because I'm going out there to do a job, and my job is to entertain."


Beltran's self-awareness is refreshing, as his assessment of the situation is probably more accurate than not. Bellator has marketed Jackson lavishly since the former champ inked a deal with Viacom, one which included reality television outlets and potential film ventures.


Nonetheless, Beltran wouldn't quite go so far as to say he was brought in by Bellator officials to lose.


"The thing is, I have enough notoriety and enough fans, a little cult following if you will, that like what I do in the cage," Beltran said.


"If I'm looking at it from a promoter's standpoint. Yeah, Rampage already has an established name. But there's a lot of people that are already kind of negative on him, saying he's washed up or he's Hollywood, stuff like that. So I come in, everybody loves an underdog story, and so if I were to win, they could totally market the s--t out of me."


As Beltran readies for his Bellator debut, he does so with high hopes, and understandably so. The pair are expected to headline Bellator 108, even above a heavyweight title tilt between Alexander Volkov vs. Vitaly Minakov.


Bellator's decision to promote Jackson's non-title debut over a championship bout raised some eyebrows, but not more so than the revelation that the fight will be contested at a 210-pound catchweight.


"I was ready to go at 205. You can interpret that however you want," Beltran said flatly. "They presented it to me like, since this is a short notice fight for Joey, we'll do it at 215. And I said, ‘F--k no. Dude, I'll make 205 just fine.' So then we went back and forth and settled at 210.


"215 would've been a big deal, because I know if somebody only had to make 215, they're probably gonna come in at fight time, 250. So I was pushing for that 205."


It's not a distant leap to assume the negotiation over weight meant that either Jackson, or someone within Jackson's camp, feared a botched weight cut. Beltran, who's already seen Jackson once at a media opportunity, says Jackson appeared "pretty big" in person, but added that he "didn't look fat or anything."


Ultimately, though, Beltran isn't concerned by whatever issues may be in play. He's a man who fought at heavyweight for seven years, and after facing the likes of Lavar Johnson and Matt Mitrione, size tends to lose it's significance. The real question on Beltran's mind is the same one weighing on the minds of many fans: does Jackson, a once ferocious competitor, still have anything left in the tank?


"Here's the thing, I don't really know," Beltran finished. "I'm banking on the guy that powerbombed Ricardo Arona through the cage. The guy that knocked out Chuck Liddell twice. I'm banking on that guy showing up to fight. I'm not banking on some washed up 35-year-old has been, or anything like that by any means. I'm banking on a crazy, howling at the moon Rampage coming for my head."


Source: http://www.mmafighting.com/2013/11/7/5067122/joey-beltran-bellator-brought-me-in-to-entertain-and-im-going-to
Category: Jennifer Aniston   world war z   Bryan Cranston   Matt Harvey   Miley Cyrus Vmas 2013  

Strongest typhoon of the year slams Philippines


MANILA, Philippines (AP) — One of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines early Friday, and one weather expert warned, "There will be catastrophic damage."

The U.S. Navy's Joint Typhoon Warning Center shortly before Typhoon Haiyan's landfall said its maximum sustained winds were 314 kilometers per hour (195 mph), with gusts up to 379 kilometers per hour (235 mph).

"195-mile-per-hour winds, there aren't too many buildings constructed that can withstand that kind of wind," said Jeff Masters, a former hurricane meteorologist who is meteorology director at the private firm Weather Underground.

Masters said the storm had been poised to be the strongest tropical cyclone ever recorded at landfall. He warned of catastrophic damage.

Local authorities reported having troubles reaching colleagues in the landfall area.

The local weather bureau had a lower reading on the storm's power, saying its speed at landfall in Eastern Samar province's Guiuan township had sustained winds at 235 kilometers (147 miles) per hour, with gusts of 275 kph (170 mph). The bureau takes measures based on longer periods of time.

Authorities in Guiuan could not immediately be reached for word of any deaths or damage, regional civil defense chief Rey Gozon told DZBB radio. Forecaster Mario Palafox with the national weather bureau said it had lost contact with its staff in the landfall area.

The storm was not expected to directly hit the flood-prone capital, Manila, further north.

The National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council said more than 125,000 people had been evacuated from towns and villages in the typhoon's path.

Typhoon Haiyan's wind strength at landfall had been expected to beat out Hurricane Camille, which was 305 kilometers per hour (190 mph) at landfall in the United States 1969, Masters said.

The only tiny bright side is that it's a fast-moving storm, so flooding from heavy rain — which usually causes the most deaths from typhoons in the Philippines — may not be as bad, Masters said.

"The wind damage should be the most extreme in Phillipines history," he said.

The storm later will be a threat to both Vietnam and Laos and is likely to be among the top five natural disasters for those two countries, Masters said. The storm is forecast to barrel through the Philippines' central region Friday and Saturday before blowing toward the South China Sea over the weekend, heading toward Vietnam.

President Benigno Aquino III on Thursday warned people to leave high-risk areas, including 100 coastal communities where forecasters said the storm surge could reach up to 7 meters (23 feet). He urged seafarers to stay in port.

Aquino ordered officials to aim for zero casualties, a goal often not met in an archipelago lashed by about 20 tropical storms each year, most of them deadly and destructive. Haiyan is the 24th such storm to hit the Philippines this year.

The president also assured the public of war-like preparations: three C-130 air force cargo planes and 32 military helicopters and planes on standby, along with 20 navy ships.

"No typhoon can bring Filipinos to their knees if we'll be united," he said in a televised address.

___

Associated Press writers Oliver Teves and Teresa Cerojano in the Philippines and Seth Borenstein in Washington contributed to this report.

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/strongest-typhoon-slams-philippines-214339268.html
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The Nexus 5 vs. the LG G2

Nexus 5 vs. LG G2

The newest Androids from LG are similar, but there are still plenty of differences

Google releases one Nexus phone each year, and there is always plenty of competition from Android vendors to compare it to. We're going to have a look at how the new LG Nexus 5 stands up against the best of the competition, and the LG G2 seemed like the logical place to start.

A lot of folks are under the impression that the Nexus 5 is just the G2 with the buttons moved to the "normal" location. While they certainly share some of the same components, and have some of the same hardware features, they are two very different animals. 

Hit the break and have a look.

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Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/androidcentral/~3/Dzzxjfi_QjA/story01.htm
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Obama Apologizes To Those Who Lost Health Plans



"I am sorry that they are finding themselves in this situation based on assurances they got from me," President Obama said Thursday, speaking about Americans who will lose their current health insurance plans.


In speeches before parts of the Affordable Care Act took effect, the president promised that people who were content with the plans they already had would be able to keep them. But that hasn't always been the case, as The Two-Way reported in October.


Obama spoke about the troubled rollout of the new health care system with NBC's Chuck Todd Thursday. Todd asked the president about the pledge he often repeated when critics of the Affordable Care Act said it would mean thousands of cancelled policies.


"I meant what I said," Obama answered. "And we worked hard to try to make sure that we implemented it properly. But obviously, we didn't do a good enough job. And I regret that."


In addition to his apology, the president pledged to help those who have complained that the new law is forcing them to sign up for a more expensive plan.


"We've got to work hard to make sure that they know we hear them," Obama said, "and that we're going to do everything we can to deal with folks who find themselves in a tough position as a consequence of this."


The appearance on NBC marks "a more apologetic tone" for the president on this issue, NPR's Ari Shapiro reports.


"Until now, the White House had taken a defensive response to people being forced to change health plans. The president insisted that people losing their plans would get better and, in some cases, cheaper ones," Ari says in a report for our Newscast unit.


"The White House is also still struggling to get the HealthCare.gov website up and running," Ari adds. "It's functioning better than before, but it's still not up to speed."


Source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/11/07/243815644/obama-apologizes-to-those-who-lost-health-plans?ft=1&f=1001
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Kerry heading to Geneva in sign of Iran progress

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammed Javad Zarif waits for the start of two days of closed-door nuclear talks at the United Nations offices in Geneva Switzerland, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Six world powers are dangling the prospect of easing some sanctions against Iran if Tehran agrees to curb work that could be used to make nuclear weapons. Talks resume Thursday between Iran and the six _ The United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. (AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini)







Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammed Javad Zarif waits for the start of two days of closed-door nuclear talks at the United Nations offices in Geneva Switzerland, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Six world powers are dangling the prospect of easing some sanctions against Iran if Tehran agrees to curb work that could be used to make nuclear weapons. Talks resume Thursday between Iran and the six _ The United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. (AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini)







U.S. Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman arrives prior to the start of two days of closed-door nuclear talks at the United Nations offices in Geneva Switzerland, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Six world powers are dangling the prospect of easing some sanctions against Iran if Tehran agrees to curb work that could be used to make nuclear weapons. Talks resume Thursday between Iran and the six _ The United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. (AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini)







A general view shows participants before the start of two days of closed-door nuclear talks at the United Nations offices in Geneva Switzerland, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Six world powers are dangling the prospect of easing some sanctions against Iran if Tehran agrees to curb work that could be used to make nuclear weapons. Talks resume Thursday between Iran and the six _ The United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. (AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini)







EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs Catherine Ashton, left, speaks with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammed Javad Zarif, right, during a photo opportunity prior the start of two days of closed-door nuclear talks at the United Nations offices in Geneva Switzerland, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Six world powers are dangling the prospect of easing some sanctions against Iran if Tehran agrees to curb work that could be used to make nuclear weapons. Talks resume Thursday between Iran and the six _ The United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. (AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini)







EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs Catherine Ashton, right, walks next to Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammed Javad Zarif, left, during a photo opportunity prior to the start of two days of closed-door nuclear talks at the United Nations offices in Geneva Switzerland, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Six world powers are dangling the prospect of easing some sanctions against Iran if Tehran agrees to curb work that could be used to make nuclear weapons. Talks resume Thursday between Iran and the six _ The United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. (AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini)







GENEVA (AP) — Iran's chief nuclear negotiator signaled progress at talks with six world powers Thursday on a deal to cap some of his country's atomic programs in exchange for limited relief from sanctions stifling Iran's economy, saying the six had accepted Tehran's proposals on how to proceed.

U.S. officials said Secretary of State John Kerry will fly to Geneva on Friday to participate in the negotiations — a last-minute decision that suggests a deal could be imminent.

A senior State Department official traveling with Kerry in Amman, Jordan, said the secretary would come to Geneva "to help narrow differences in negotiations." The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to release information about the Geneva visit.

Even if an agreement is reached, it would only be the start of a long process to reduce Iran's potential nuclear threat, with no guarantee of ultimate success.

Still, a limited accord would mark a breakthrough after nearly a decade of mostly inconclusive talks focused on limiting, if not eliminating, Iranian atomic programs that could be turned from producing energy into making weapons.

Tehran's chief nuclear negotiator, Abbas Araghchi, told Iranian state TV that the six — the United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany — "clearly said that they accept the proposed framework by Iran." He later told CNN that he thinks negotiators at the table are now "ready to start drafting" an accord that outlines specific steps to be taken.

Though Araghchi described the negotiations as "very difficult," he told Iranian state TV that he expected agreement on details by Friday, the last scheduled round of the current talks.

The upbeat comments suggested that negotiators in Geneva were moving from broad discussions over a nuclear deal to details meant to limit Tehran's ability to make atomic weapons. In return, Iran would start getting relief from sanctions that have hit its economy hard.

U.S. officials said Kerry will travel to the Geneva talks after a brief stop in Israel, where he will hold a third meeting with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who has spoken out against any limited deal that would allow the Iranians sanctions relief.

In Geneva, Kerry is expected to meet Friday with the European Union's top diplomat, Catherine Ashton, and Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, the officials said. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to comment on the schedule.

The talks are primarily focused on the size and output of Iran's enrichment program, which can create both reactor fuel and weapons-grade material suitable for a nuclear bomb. Iran insists it is pursuing only nuclear energy, medical treatments and research, but the United States and its allies fear that Iran could turn this material into the fissile core of nuclear warheads.

International negotiators representing the six powers declined to comment on Araghchi's statement. Bur White House spokesman Jay Carney elaborated on what the U.S. calls a "first step" of a strategy meant to ultimately contain Iran's ability to use its nuclear program to make weapons.

An initial agreement would "address Iran's most advanced nuclear activities; increase transparency so Iran will not be able to use the cover of talks to advance its program; and create time and space as we negotiate a comprehensive agreement," Carney told reporters in Washington.

The six would consider "limited, targeted and reversible relief that does not affect our core sanctions," he said, alluding to penalties crippling Tehran's oil exports. If Iran reneges, said Carney, "the temporary, modest relief would be terminated, and we would be in a position to ratchet up the pressure even further by adding new sanctions."

He described any temporary, initial relief of sanctions as likely "more financial rather than technical." Diplomats have previously said initial sanction rollbacks could free Iranian funds in overseas accounts and allow trade in gold and petrochemicals.

Warily watching from the sidelines, Israel warned against a partial agreement that foresees lifting sanctions now instead of waiting for a rigorous final accord that eliminates any possibility of Iran making nuclear weapons.

At a meeting with U.S. legislators in Jerusalem, Netanyahu spoke of "the deal of the century for Iran." While divulging no details, he said the proposed first step at Geneva "will relieve all the (sanctions) pressure inside Iran."

The last round of talks three weeks ago reached agreement on a framework of possible discussion points, and the two sides kicked off Thursday's round focused on getting to that first step.

Thursday's meeting ended about an hour after it began, followed by bilateral meetings, including one between the U.S and Iranian delegations. EU spokesman Michael Mann said the talks were "making progress."

Before the morning round, Zarif, the Iranian foreign minister, met with the EU's Ashton, who is convening the meeting. Asked afterward about the chances of agreement on initial steps this week, Zarif told reporters: "If everyone tries their best, we may have one."

After nearly a decade of deadlock, Iran seems more amenable to making concessions to the six countries. Iran's new president, Hassan Rouhani, has indicated he could cut back on the nuclear program in exchange for an easing of sanctions.

Despite the seemingly calmer political backdrop, issues remain.

Iranian hardliners want a meaningful — and quick — reduction of the sanctions in exchange for any concessions, while some U.S. lawmakers want significant rollbacks in Iran's nuclear activities in exchange for any loosening of actions.

_____

Associated Press Diplomatic Writer Matthew Lee in Amman, Jordan, contributed to this report. AP writers Josef Federman in Jerusalem, Jim Kuhnhenn in Washington and Nasser Karimi in Tehran also contributed.

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/3d281c11a96b4ad082fe88aa0db04305/Article_2013-11-07-Iran-Nuclear%20Talks/id-3fbaf564e75946f599a3d08c6827c588
Category: CMA Awards 2013   Andre Rison   EBT   yom kippur   American flag  

Penny Marshall, Cindy Williams together again




This image released by Nickelodeon shows, from left, Penny Marshall, Jennette McCurdy, Ariana Grande and Cindy Williams in a scene from the series "Sam & Cat." Marshall and Williams, best known from their comedy series "Laverne and Shirley," will guest star in the episode airing Saturday, Nov. 9, at 8 p.m. EST. (AP Photo/Nickelodeon, Lisa Rose)






LOS ANGELES (AP) — Penny Marshall and Cindy Williams play feuding ex-TV partners on an episode of Nickelodeon's "Sam & Cat," but they brush aside any comparison to their past.

The former "Laverne & Shirley" stars, who back in the day of their 1976-83 sitcom were reported to have crossed swords, said they were never enemies and remain friends despite lingering suggestions to the contrary.

"That was rumors. Any show you work on for eight years, you're gonna argue at some point," said Marshall. "Way overblown."

Williams agreed, but added a bit of detail.

"Yes, it was a bit overblown," she said. The actress added that she and Marshall have "very different personalities" with contradictory styles of working, which sometimes led to on-set clashes.

That said, Williams regularly visits Marshall's house to watch and discuss TV. There's a chill in the air, Williams said, but only because Marshall keeps her thermostat turned down and, to compensate, provides down coats and blankets for guests.

Marshall, whose big-screen directing credits include "A League of Their Own" and "Big," is busy working on a documentary about provocative ex-NBA player Dennis Rodman. But she and Williams were enticed by "Sam & Cat" creator Dan Schneider to guest star on the comedy airing at 8 p.m. EST on Saturday.

"He loved our show," Williams said. "He wanted to do a little tribute."

In the episode, Sam (Jennette McCurdy) and Cat (Ariana Grande) face having to rename their baby-sitting business because it's similar to "Salmon Cat," a faux 1970s TV show. The young women track down the show's creators (Marshall and Williams) and try to dissolve their enmity.

In another Nickelodeon reunion, "Happy Days" creator Garry Marshall (brother of Penny Marshall), makes a guest appearance on "See Dad Run" starring Scott Baio, a cast member on the 1974-84 sitcom starring Henry Winkler and Ron Howard.

The "See Dad Run" episode airs 8 p.m. EST on Sunday.

___

Online:

http://www.nick.com

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/penny-marshall-cindy-williams-together-again-152213089.html
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Lego wheel turns tortoise into a bionic turtle

Lego wheel turns tortoise into a bionic turtle

Schildi is not your average turtle. After having been abandoned and losing a leg, some awesome German vets found a way to make him a better, stronger, faster tortoise. Now, fitted with a Lego wheel for a leg, he's a bionic hero in a half shell. And he's stolen my heart.

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Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/kMH2u9QJ_O0/@barrett
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